Book review: World Order, by Henry Kissinger

Love or loathe him, Henry Kissinger has amassed enormous experience. In his latest meditation, World Order, the 91-year-old American statesman argues that the United States must address mounting global tensions. Read at the South China Morning Post.


How to fight liver disease – make up for youthful excesses

Read at the South China Morning Post.


Lose Your Inches Without Losing Your Mind

American nutritionist Justine SanFilippo knows how badly a fad diet can harm your health; she has tried too many to count.”I had no energy, my brain was foggy and I had this weird, metallic taste in my mouth,” she writes of one low-carb diet’s effect. “To this day, we still think all carbs are bad. But we need them for energy. Read at the South China Morning Post.


Book review: The Inner Enemies of Democracy, by Tzvetan Todorov

During the early 20th century, French essayist Charles Péguy wrote: “There is in the Declaration of Human Rights enough to make war on everybody for as long as the world lasts!”

Péguy was right, according to Bulgarian-born historian Tzvetan Todorov.

Read at the South China Morning Post.


Book review: Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy, by Saskia Sassen

Now is a dire time to be poor, according to Columbia University sociology professor Saskia Sassen. In this scathing assessment of advanced global capitalism, Sassen says that as inequality widens, have-nots face expulsion from their jobs and homes. Read at the South China Morning Post.


Book review: Seeking the Cave, by James Lenfestey

Cold Mountain Cave may sound like a mythical staple of Chinese literature, but it exists, says poet and essayist James Lenfestey. Better yet, the cave once housed Lenfestey’s idol: Tang dynasty bard Han Shan (which literally means Cold Mountain), who wrote the Cold Mountain poems. Read at the South China Morning Post


Renminbi investors unlikely to make a killing just yet

China is set to edge the United States as the world’s biggest economy this year, according to the World Bank. With the US increasingly cast as a fading force, the renminbi could well be the natural successor to the US dollar as the reserve currency, it’s said. So investing in China’s currency, the renminbi (RMB), seems a shrewd move – or is it?

Read at the Sydney Morning Herald.


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