Counting sheep won’t help you sleep, but other techniques will

High-pressure Hong Kong is nicknamed the city that never sleeps. Most of us manage to string some shut-eye together, but you may well suffer from sleep disruption, which can leave you feeling shattered when morning rolls around. Read at the South China Morning Post (scmp.com).


Bitcoin can help travellers cut costs of foreign exchange

Moving money overseas is notoriously expensive. The way to avoid being gouged by brutal online banking costs could be to enlist the power of the alternative currency bitcoin.

Read more at the Sydney Morning Herald.


Ten foods to avoid for a healthier lifestyle

These foods may taste delicious but you can stay much healthier by avoiding them. Read at the South China Morning Post.


Barbra Streisand’s Memories

This nostalgia-laced musical throwback seems on the verge of oblivion. But in its day, Memories, which featured previously released material and three freshly recorded songs, achieved what appeared to be indelible success. Read at the South China Morning Post.


Lou Schuler’s fitness guide The Lean Muscle Diet offers sensible advice

Dieting may do more harm than good. While you can lose up to 10 per cent of your body weight by following a diet, the ritual itself is heavily implicated in future weight gain, according to fitness journalist Lou Schuler. Read at the South China Morning Post.


Transsexual Siobhan Ellis making it in the corporate world

If you thought corporations automatically shun strong individuals, you should meet Siobhan Ellis. The enterprise services expert employed by the computing giant HP is a transsexual, who changed gender in 2004 in California, driven by necessity.

“It’s not a choice – it’s not a choice at all,” says Sydney-based Ellis, 51, berating the perception she was brave.

Read at the Sydney Morning Herald.


Compassion on cold Adelaide streets

Even on the iciest nights you may spot community leader Aileen Jefferis on Adelaide’s streets. Jefferis, 58, helps the homeless, whose need she says is overwhelming. Still, she works full-time as a physiotherapist, among other commitments, unfazed by the pressure.

Read at the Sydney Morning Herald.


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